GANDHI HAD HIS CONTRACTIONS, JUST AS OTHER GREAT MEN. - Part 2

This process never stops. When we stop examining ourselves to see where we could improve, the learning process stops, and we revert to ignorance. As a member of the teaching profession,

GANDHI HAD HIS CONTRACTIONS, JUST AS OTHER GREAT MEN. - Part 2

Part Two

This process never stops. When we stop examining ourselves to see where we could improve, the learning process stops, and we revert to ignorance. As a member of the teaching profession,

teachers are constantly told at the end of every lesson to do some reflection to evaluate their performance. In this reflection, teachers have to ask themselves if the students learned anything.

Teachers have to ask themselves what part of the lesson could be improved so that all the students could benefit 100%. For the professional teacher, this is a daily process.   

 

Most educated Indians, who fought for Indian independence, had a colonized education. Colonized education taught the Indians to look outside of India, more specifically, towards Western nations for solutions for Indian problems. Even today, the educated Indians, in the absence of a British Viceroy, place their hope for India in the foreign ideology of Marxism and its solutions. They refused to recognize Indians, in the past, were great traders and manufacturers of everything the country needed. India was considered the richest country in the world from the 12 th century to the 1700’s. Marxist Indians could not see the possibility of finding solutions in Indian historical commerce, and philosophy such as the Vedas. As a result, India lost two generations of economic development on failed socialist Soviet style policies. Gandhiji was a product of this colonial era of learning. He left India as a typical colonial Indian with dreams of going to England and becoming the perfect English lawyer i.e. the PERFECT ENGLISHMAN. His hopes of being a lawyer in the British Empire, while serving in Africa and India were soon met with disappointment. These hopes were based on the myth of all citizens of the Empire would be treated equally. After repeated experiences with British racism as a victim, Gandhi started his long journey towards enlightenment. His ADHARMA sent him to England wearing a 3-piece suit, and while his DHARMA returned him to India wearing a Dhoti. Gandhiji also began to look towards Indian philosophy and history for solutions. He started serious studies in Vedic literature, Indian self-help activities, and Indian cottage industries.    

 

Gandhiji enlightenment led to the transformation of the man, who left India in a three pieced suit and returned to India in dhoti by: discovering his Vedic identity, living among the diaspora indentured Indians, and experiencing racism in South Africa. In South Africa, he started fighting for Indian civil rights. Gandhi’s overall civil rights struggles extended benefits to black South Africans. Gandhiji fought for Muslims, black Africans, Tamils and everyone who sought his help. He was involved in getting blacks to engage in political activities. Gandhi contributed to black African political enlightenment.  Gandhi may have made some politically incorrect statements about Africans, but he did the same in regards to lower caste Indians. Enlightenment in politics or religion comes about through a learning process. Mistakes will be made by men, who go on to become great. Political and philosophical views have to be developed and revised over time. Political consciousness doesn’t develop in a straight linear line. Gandhi consciousness evolved through his hunger strikes, beatings, salt marches and imprisonments.

(To Be Continued)