Garam Massala brought friends together.

Friends of Hariji and former workers of the Hindu Jawan Sangh and Hindu Seva Sangh came together at Garam Masala to have dinner, reflect on the past and bring cheers to Hariji who has been ailing for some time.

Garam Massala brought friends together.
Photo : Friends and workers of Hindu Seva Sangh at Garam Massala-Hariji in blue and seated, Krishna Dube, Nelson Ramdeen, Dr Primnath Gooptar, Kumar Rambarran and Dool Hanomansingh.

Friends of Hariji and former workers of the Hindu Jawan Sangh and Hindu Seva Sangh came together at Garam Masala to have dinner, reflect on the past and bring cheers to Hariji who has been ailing for some time.

The initiative was taken by Krishna Dube who flew in from New York and contacted the friends to set aside an evening to spend some time with Hariji. We agreed to meet on Thursday August 09.

Members reflected on the days spent working on the many projects of the Jawaan Sangh and Seva Sangh while they ate the delicious dishes. Other members expressed their regrets that they could not join with us.

The seven workers have contributed an average of 35 years in community service and many continue to serve. In New York Dube works with the Satya Sai Movement and has made two trips to Puttaparthi, India to the Sai Ashram. Dr Primnath Gooptar is a researcher/writer and has been a key player in the organization of academic conferences sponsored by the National Council of Indian Culture. Kumar Rambarran works with the Chinmaya Mission. Now retired, Kumar has the responsibility to buy vegetables for Garam Massala every Thursday. Nelson Ramdeen continues to work through the Hindu Prachaar Kendra. He is also engaged in backyard gardening using recycled containers. As for Ramsewak Ramphalie he enjoys travelling the length and breadth of this land using the PTSC bus service.

Hariji has been an inspiration to us all. His vision has inspired many young workers across this land. His leadership has seen the revival of Phagwa and Chowtal in the mid-1970s. Through the youth camps hundreds of youths were educated on their dharma and motivated to go to their respected villages and engage in social and cultural activities.

Indian Arrival Day was the brainchild of Ramdath Jagessar, first secretary of the Sangh. Through Sankritans, Satsanghs, discourses and pamphleteering Indians were made aware of the significance of this event. Of significance was the erection of the Sewdas Sadhu Monument at the Temple in the Sea at Waterloo. This project inspired other Hindus to rebuild the temple. Today Sewdas Sadhu is a symbol of resistance to cultural imperialism.

 It was my first trip to Garam Massala and I was impressed with the ambience, the friendly staff and the wide range of dishes. I am looking forward to  another get together  at Garam Massala to enjoy great food and reflect on the many great achievements of the Jawaan Sangh and Hindu Seva Sangh.