INDIANS HAD NO SAY IN POLITICAL FORMATION OF POST COLONIAL GOVERNMENTS

Our African forefathers who were prominent in Trinidad / Guyana / Surinam trying to get rid of colonial rule created the Original Sin that remains the basis   of our political and social inequalities and our present-day security dilemma.

INDIANS HAD NO SAY IN POLITICAL FORMATION OF POST COLONIAL GOVERNMENTS
Photo : Vassan Ramracha

Our African forefathers who were prominent in Trinidad / Guyana / Surinam trying to get rid of colonial rule created the Original Sin that remains the basis   of our political and social inequalities and our present-day security dilemma.

Since the dawn of our independence the Caribbean Indian has had minimum input in the making of a new nation moving forward. Actually, the Indian input was restricted to signing off for independence as required in Trinidad / Suriname. Not so in Guyana.  The entire political and social infrastructures were setup and designed to keep Africans in power and have Indians on the periphery.

Specifically, in Trinidad and Guyana the constitutions, flag, anthems, emblems, judiciary, armed forces and the election boundaries had no Indian input. Indians had little or no role in the making of these government institutions. Even the media was mostly controlled by the government.

Today in Guyana and Trinidad the African man by their invested power in all aspects of government believes that the assumption privilege is theirs' only. In the case of Guyana we then find President Granger can refuse to respect the rule of law even when the High Court rules the President must resign and set a date for elections

As long as most governmental institutions are controlled by one kumbaya interest, ethnic rivalry and distrust will flourish. Power must be decentralized for the rule of law to be respected.

Vassan Ramracha